Frequently Asked Questions

Is Tupelo a blockchain or DAG?

Tupelo is a distributed ledger built on a unique data structure called a ChainTree.  A unique ChainTree is generated for each object modeled in the system.  A ChainTree consists of a blockchain for tracking history and a DAG for storing information ~about~ the object.  A DAG data-structure can be part of an alternative to a “single strand” blockchain, but it can be used for lots of other things as well.  

How is Tupelo different from DAG based systems such as Hashgraph or IOTA?

Tupelo is a distributed ledger built on a unique data structure called a ChainTree.  A unique ChainTree is generated for each object modeled in the system.  A ChainTree consists of a blockchain for tracking history and a DAG for storing information ~about~ the object.  A DAG data-structure can be part of an alternative to a “single strand” blockchain, but it can be used for lots of other things as well.  

I need to keep some of my data private or shared among a few players?
How can Tupelo help me keep sensitive data secure and private?

Tupelo separates trust from storage and allows developers to keep pieces of their ChainTrees where it is most appropriate. This also allows ChainTree owners to decide to keep sections of their ChainTree public, sections within a consortium and some completely private. All of the data descends from the same trusted root and owners cannot present one version of truth to one party and a different version to another.

The fact that the data was added and could only be added by the owner of the ChainTree means that the network can validate the change but that the exact contents remain entirely private.  Only the parties authorized in the appropriate ACL can then access the details.  

I am concerned that my data is not secure. How does Tupelo protect the integrity of the data it verifies?

Tupelo maintains the integrity of the data stored in ChainTrees by maintaining the TIP (that is the hash of the entire structure) of the latest state of every object. Every change to an object (transaction) must be submitted including the tip BEFORE and AFTER the change is made. The network then verifies and consenses on the transaction. Once verified it becomes the new validated object state. If a transaction transfers between ChainTrees the network enforces that a valid SEND must be validated before a RECIEVE can be processed. You can read more detail about this in our whitepaper.

How does storage work on Tupelo?

Unlike other blockchains, Tupelo’s validation of trust is separate from how the information about objects is stored.  Various storage options (S3, private storage, IPFS, Arweave) can be selected based on a specific applications needs.   

By separating trust from storage, options increase dramatically. 

Why doesn’t Tupelo use smart contracts?

Tupelo models ownership into the base protocol. The protocol maintains information about objects and validates all transfers between owners through a simple API. This means most of what other protocols need to accomplish through smart contracts Tupelo provides through secure, simple requests. Tupelo also supports adding logical conditions to the ChainTrees themselves that the network then validates as transactions are processed. Through these mechanisms Tupelo provides much of what smart contracts provide without the risks and costs.

Does Tupelo support NFTs?

Yes, Tupelo definitely supports NFTs. Tupelo could be considered an NFT native platform. Tupelo is  based on “objects” (NFTs) rather than coins that then must be made unique. Tupelo starts with non-fungible objects and adds fungible coins for things like fractional ownership where that makes sense.

Is Tupelo interoperable with other blockchains?

Value exchange with other blockchains is on the roadmap, particularly through ChainTree “conditions” (similar to bitcoin script) which lay the groundwork for HTLCs and other similar constructs. The Tupelo APIs provide a base for any developer that requires bridges to other blockchains to build them into their application.

How does Tupelo verify transactions?

The Tupelo network verifies transactions by first validating that each transaction follows the protocol and then building consensus across its signer network of its new state. Currently, there is a small set of trusted signers operating nodes on the Tupelo network.  We call this the “friends and family” network which can be used for production applications and is fully functional, just with a limited set of signers. The Tupelo network will be made fully public (allowing new signers to stake and join) as part of the public main-net launch.

When will Tupelo main-net be launched?

The “friends and family” version of the Tupelo network is available now for production applications. The fully permissionless main-net will launch at the end of 2020 allowing new signers to stake and start verifying transactions. Because of the unique ChainTree structure, each object is independent and no history or data will be lost during the transition.

Can I buy Tuples?

The Tupelo Network employs a two token system.  First, there are “signer” tokens called “Tuples.”  Tuples are used to stake signing nodes and also grant the holder the right to mint Transaction tokens.  These Transaction tokens are the ones submitted to make use of the network within applications.  Transaction tokens are not required to use the current test-net.  Tuples are not yet publicly being sold but if you are an accredited investor and are interested in limited pre-sales please contact us to learn more.

Cool, when can I start building on Tupelo?

You can start building on Tupelo right now! You can use our Test-Net today or easily run nodes yourself locally to test it out. The team behind Tupelo is focused on making it easy to get started and we are here to work with you through the development and launch of your production application.
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